tips & tricks

It’s a Jungle Out There

From: John DuMontelle, www.latincam.net How many times do we find ourselves shooting an interview in a situation where we don’t have access to electricity. All of a sudden we’re stuck with our camera light. Working in Nicaragua I end up having to shoot a lot of these interviews on remote mountain tops or backwater jungle. I carry two MAG-LITE flashlights. The big ones with six batteries in them. I cut…

Shootin’ From the Hip

From: Kim Fatica Most of us wear the familiar Porta-Brace “saddle bags” around our waists, which we use for all our little gadgets like microphone stands, spare tapes, spare batteries, small cables, a lens cloth, gum, snacks; you name it, we have it. Those hip packs are also useful for keeping your camera steady. There are many instances where a tripod may not be practical in the day-to-day scramble of…

Keep It Smooth

From: From: Stephen Press, Cameragod How to do a smoother pan on a tripod on a long lens. Thinking back to my high school physics that secret to doing a smoother pan is all to do with levers. The panhandle sticking out at the back of the tripod head is a long lever. If you pan using it your hand has to travel a long distance to make the camera…

Reporter Sandwich

From: Duke Taylor and Lisa Carlson All the photogs at my station have great light kits, but actually I usually only bring one light fitted with a Chimera (it’s like a big cloth box with black sides and a white front…it softens the light) into an interview. Figure out where you want the camera to be, where you want the iterviewer and interviewee to be, turn off the room lights,…

Back Focus Settings

For a variety of reasons, your backfocus can be messed up. Anything from using someone elses camera to swapping out a lens. I’ve had to adjust my backfocus in the field several times. Put the camera on sticks. Zoom in and focus on something really far away. Tree branches, a fence, anything with nice fine/thin lines. I also like to use my neutral density filters to make the focus point…

TIP | Making a Blue Computer Fit In

From: Stephen Press, New Zealand Shooting a computer screen and surrounds is very easy. Just light with a ¼ blue, ctb and everything looks the same.

Reflect On This

From: Mark Rich One way to reduce the eyeglass reflection during interviews is to have the subject tilt the glasses down by raising the temples. This works if the subject has hair that goes over their ears. This is an old still photo trick, works pretty well for medium and long shots but can be a problem with extreme close-ups.