Tag Archives: Lighting Tip
ctb

TIP | Making a Blue Computer Fit In

From: Stephen Press, New Zealand Shooting a computer screen and surrounds is very easy. Just light with a ¼ blue, ctb and everything looks the same.

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Reflect On This

From: Mark Rich One way to reduce the eyeglass reflection during interviews is to have the subject tilt the glasses down by raising the temples. This works if the subject has hair that goes over their ears. This is an old still photo trick, works pretty well for medium and long shots but can be […]

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Get the Scoop!

From: Photoglisa@aol.com Someone posted a tip on how to scrim down your camera mounted light with used dryer sheets…here’s a trick if you’re out in the field and don’t happen to handily have one static-clinged to your fleece vest. Sometimes I find myself in a poorly lit area getting quick bites with a bunch of […]

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Look, No Static Cling!

From: Bob Murdock – WFXT – Boston Frezzi light too hot on your “heads”?? Scrim it down a bit. Pull the dicro ring off place some scrim over the lamp and replace the dicro to hold it there. I use old dryer fabric softener sheets! Make sure they’ve gone through at least 2 drying cycles […]

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TIP | Light Up My Life

From: Posts on the b-roll.net FORUM I’m still kind of new to the photojournalist world. Recently I’ve hit a great zone. Shooting good stuff, using my tripod (a lot) and making good use of my wireless mic. But I have had a few problems with interview lighting, the interviewees wearing glasses. I get the light […]

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TIP | Lightning and Thunder from Down Under

From: Peter Kavanagh Nine News Perth, Western Australia When Shooting lightning, use a 5600K balance. Most cammos would use filter one on preset (3200K) or a similar saved balance. I now shoot lightning on filter one with an over 5600K balance and it looks much better. Also, try kicking in some shutter speed. I usually […]

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Sunshine Rain

From: Adam Tischler Not a trick but a nice lighting technique I just picked up. When indoors use daylight for your keylight. Backlight with an umbrella pointing down on the subject using 3200 light. The result is nice, even, reddish light cascading down the subjects head and shoulders. No problems with harsh backlight. It works […]

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