Cell Phone IFB in the b-roll.net GEAR Store

UPDATE: The Cell Phone IFB is no longer available from the b-roll.net GEAR store. Please visit http://cellphoneifb.com for more information on purchasing this unit.

Back in November, we told you about a cool new product from Canada called Cell Phone IFB.

Basically, the Remote Talkback Cell Phone IFB is a compact amplified adapter that allows you to use professional IFB earpieces with a standard cell phone. The concept is simple and effective — why deal with a complicated built-in IFB system in your live truck when you can have your earpiece connected to the cell phone already hanging on the reporter or photographer’s belt?

We’re pleased to announce that b-roll.net is the exclusive U.S. online dealer for the Remote Talkback Cell Phone IFB. You can now purchase the product directly from the b-roll.net GEAR store.

Steve Gullickson of Active Media has built a quality product, and we’re proud to make it the first TV equipment sold at the b-roll.net GEAR store.

With more products to come, the b-roll.net GEAR store is a great way to learn more about innovative TV photography products and support b-roll.net at the same time.

For more information, check out:
http://cellphoneifb.com
b-roll.net GEAR store

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5 Responses to “Cell Phone IFB in the b-roll.net GEAR Store”

  1. What are the benifits to buying this? I have been using a cpc-1 adaptor cord from audio implements? it costs 35.00 and works great… Every photog and reporter has had one at our station for a couple of years..

  2. We’ve used this device when broadcasting from news events that are loud (ie: protests, sports, concerts/live events), and unit does a great job amplifying the incoming cell phone signal. We can also have two IFB’s off the same cell phone. The versatility is worth the investment!!

  3. I have to say that I am not a big fan of cell phone IFB systems. We have to use them at my station for our CW shows since our trucks are rather primitive (they still have analog transmitters). There are a lot of rural areas in my market where phone reception is awful. I’ve also had problems with the phone hanging up on the reporter. There have been many occasions where it our system simply hasn’t worked, forcing me to call the booth and have the producer tell me when to cue the talent. Also, the way my station is set up, I have to tell engineering that my reporter is dialing in so they can set things up at the station. If the phone hangs up, I have to get engineering to reset the system. Also, my station doesn’t give reporters work phones, meaning they have to use mine to dial in, which also means the station can’t call it if they need to. Generally, I don’t like to use cell phones for IFB unless I have to.

  4. look like a great little tool ti keep in your bag of tricks.

    I work in the number 2 market for one of the top three and we still use cell phone IFB with a lot of the problems that John has.

  5. I simply replaced the 1/8″ mono on an audio implements cord with a 3/32″ stereo. The homemade version of what Todd P mentioned.

    I am waiting for someone to build a bluetooth version of this. I envision the bluetooth receiver clipping to the back of the shirt just like the IFB amp does now, and being able to use existing eartubes. So many phones have bluetooth now, you could have two receivers from one phone, no chords, your own mini wireless IFB!

    A side benefit would be a bluetooth setup I would actually use. The things that hang on your ear look either terribly pretentious or unforgivably nerdy.